Hey Everyone! I'm a Brazilian guy who loves traveling and discovering new cultures. For a long time, I thought I would have to get stuck in a 9-5 for the rest of my life. Luckily, I found the possibility of building an online business that allows me to work whenever and wherever I want! Click here to discover the exact same training and strategy I use to make money online and pursue my dreams.
A few links down and I've noticed that Brian has a link from WordPress.org. Not bad! Turns out that his content has been referenced within one of WordPress's codex posts. If I were to reach out and offer some additional insight, citing one of my articles, there's a chance I could bag a similar link, especially considering they have a 'Useful Resources' section.
To rank your website in top searches in any search engine. So you are using keywords, it may be a good trick but not for some organic users. So if you want to attract more visitors who are really interested in your website you must go with long tail keywords which are more specific with your website and more visitors with interest. And also it will boost your content in search rankings and help your ideal customers find you.
As we briefly mentioned above, your website or blog posts should target your audience (your prospects, your readers). You should be writing to them. You should be asking yourself what your target audience is searching for on Google. Based on that, you should provide the solutions to their inquiries in the form of content that is coherent with their search terms. In other words, the keywords or key phrases you use within your content must coincide with what your audience is actively searching.

Pumpkin Hacking – This is a term that I came across (thank you Peter Da Vanzo) that seems to describe exactly what we did to continue to grow our traffic by double and even triple digits, month after month. The core concept is simple; focus resources on building what works. What this meant for us was paying attention to the search verticals and content that received the most traffic, most comments, most social shares, and being quick to cut the cord on traffic that didn’t perform.
Thanks for sharing this insightful article on how to get organic traffic to my website. I agree with you that it is really frustrating posting articles on a site with little or no traffic to view my content. I think your article is right on time and I agree that creating high quality content, targeting low competition keywords, not being distracted and other vital points you made will really help me generate traffic into my blog. 
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
Google Analytics is an invaluable source of data on just about every conceivable aspect of your site, from your most popular pages to visitor demographics. Keep a close eye on your Analytics data, and use this information to inform your promotional and content strategies. Pay attention to what posts and pages are proving the most popular. Inspect visitor data to see how, where and when your site traffic is coming from.
Open the app to to enter the number of visits, the interval between visits, and if you'd like to see pages displayed. The program's default sites to check file includes a few sites from the well-known Yahoo and MSN to an unfamiliar site we won't name in this review. Changing the list didn't change the fact the application directed traffic to the unfamiliar site more often than sites listed. Testers concluded the app masks the fact that every installation will direct traffic to that unfamiliar site.
A few links down and I've noticed that Brian has a link from WordPress.org. Not bad! Turns out that his content has been referenced within one of WordPress's codex posts. If I were to reach out and offer some additional insight, citing one of my articles, there's a chance I could bag a similar link, especially considering they have a 'Useful Resources' section.

Ask a marketer or business owner what they’d like most in the world, and they’ll probably tell you “more customers.” What often comes after customers on a business’ wish list? More traffic to their site. There are many ways you can increase traffic on your website, and in today’s post, we’re going to look at 25 of them, including several ways to boost site traffic for FREE.
The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
To sum up all of this information, even organic traffic, like direct traffic, has some gray areas. For the most part, though, organic traffic is driven by SEO. The better you are ranking for competitive keywords, the more organic traffic will result. Websites that consistently create content optimized for search will see a steady increase in organic search traffic and improved positioning in the search results. As a marketer, it is important to look at your keywords and high-ranking pages to identify new SEO opportunities each month.  
This is another program doing much the same as the previous two, but it has a few unique aspects that put it on this list above the hordes of others. Particularly, it comes in many forms; a web interface, a stand-alone browser, a windows or mac executable or even a paid version. In a fit of goodwill, the paid version – costing $30 for the cheapest version – comes with a huge warning to try the free version before buying. It also warns of a lack of refund policy, so buyer beware.
Tailwind: This is an automatic scheduler designed mainly for Pinterest, and now also available for Instagram and Facebook. It operates on the same principles as Buffer and is a must if you use Pinterest extensively. It also has a Chrome extension. Tailwind has a 30 day trial and then is $15/month or $9.99/month if you pay annually. There are more plans to upgrade to if you need to.
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