In my experience, content has impacted SEO and organic traffic more than pretty much any other one element (assuming you have a reasonably clean, fast, structurally sound site). That’s not to say things like sitemaps and link building aren’t important. They are, 100%. But, if you’re really trying to increase organic traffic dramatically, improving and creating content will be your best bet because it's essentially what your site is made up of. Plus, great content can help you earn links and boost your traffic in other ways so it’s what you should start with anyway.
Guest blogging purely for inbound links is a flawed strategy because the value of those links are going down. However, guest blogging for traffic is still an incredibly viable strategy. While that inbound link you get at the end of a guest post doesn’t have as much SEO value as it used to, it still has the value of exposing your content to a new audience.
No, this isn’t a tool to generate traffic jams on your way to work. Instead, it’s a piece of software a lot like 1MC, designed to send hits towards a website repeatedly. This one is a quick and easy to use program, with very little in the way of customization options, but that’s okay. It’s designed to do one thing and one thing only, and it does that thing.
You’re not limited to promoting your website or blog posts on Social Media. You can do this with other blogs, especially in your niche. You can reach out to bloggers in the same niche and write a guest post on their blog. If their audience reads and likes your blog post, they may come to your blog to read more of your content. By being able to post your blog post links on other websites, you are effectively practicing the art of “backlinking”. Backlinking is a strategy that increases your website ranking on the search engine results.

The Internet is positively riddled with traffic generators. They range from low-quality autorefresh bots using proxies to appear as though they come from around the world, to sophisticated traffic exchange systems powered by real people and real advertising. Ideally, you’ll strike upon the most valuable of these networks when you’re searching, but there’s a few problems.

This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?


Analysis – Using our newly built algorithm we got to testing, creating websites to test content patterns and architecture. We were quick to declare defeat within verticals without traction, and paid close attention to where the traffic was growing the most. The algorithm started to take shape and after roughly 3 months was able to identify within an order of magnitude the amount of traffic we could acquire for a given set of costs.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.

The strength of your link profile isn’t solely determined by how many sites link back to you – it can also be affected by your internal linking structure. When creating and publishing content, be sure to keep an eye out for opportunities for internal links. This not only helps with SEO, but also results in a better, more useful experience for the user – the cornerstone of increasing traffic to your website.


For another thing, the Internet has somewhere in the neighborhood of two decades worth of traffic bot programs littering the digital ground. Some have gone through upwards of a dozen name changes and rebrands, moving from one site to another. They disappear, leaving existing users in the lurch, never to receive support or updates when the program stops working. Then identical software comes out under a new name, charging anywhere from $5 to $250, scamming people out of their cash with the same back-end software.
Buffer App: This is a free app that you connect to your social media accounts. You can upgrade to a Pro account that gives you more features. You can configure the dates & times you need to post. Once your accounts are connected, you can select what you want to share on social media and click on Buffer. It’ll ask you which accounts you want to post to and you can customize the “message” you want to promote, by adding hashtags, images and a brief description. You can also install a Chrome extension that allows you to instantly “Buffer” any website post you’re on.
The days when internet browsing was done exclusively on desktop PCs are long gone. Today, more people than ever before are using mobile devices to access the web, and if you force your visitors to pinch and scroll their way around your site, you’re basically telling them to go elsewhere. Ensure that your website is accessible and comfortably viewable across a range of devices, including smaller smartphones.
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