Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
Learning the systems and educating yourself on how to get organic traffic for your website is critical for the success of your business. You will hear some people disagree with this and very often you will see them creating PPC campaigns to drive traffic. This costs money however and for those of you just getting started, maybe there is not a lot of that to spare.

Keyword Tracking in SEO: The 5 Irrefutable Laws Keyword tracking is like calorie counting. It’s time-consuming and boring and unexciting. But if you will yourself to do it, day in and day out, you’re all but guaranteed to see positive results. Where diligent calorie counting leads to weight loss… …diligent keyword tracking leads to higher rankings on search...

For another thing, the Internet has somewhere in the neighborhood of two decades worth of traffic bot programs littering the digital ground. Some have gone through upwards of a dozen name changes and rebrands, moving from one site to another. They disappear, leaving existing users in the lurch, never to receive support or updates when the program stops working. Then identical software comes out under a new name, charging anywhere from $5 to $250, scamming people out of their cash with the same back-end software.


Encourage incoming links. Google prioritises sites that have a lot of incoming links, especially from other trustworthy sites. Encourage clients, friends, family members, partners, suppliers, industry mavens and friendly fellow bloggers to link to your site. The more incoming links you have the higher your site will rank. But beware SEO snake oil salesmen who try to trick Google with spammy links from low-reputation sites. Some links can actually damage your SEO.

Using this data can help you identify additional “buyer” keywords to target and what keywords to stop targeting. Keyword research, content marketing, and link building are things that you need to constantly be doing, even when you reach the top of the search rankings. Many businesses think that they can slow down these efforts once they reach the top, but easing up on your SEO strategy will see your competition take over the top position if you are not continually improving your search engine optimization effort.
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This is a topic that for some time has lingered on my mind. Trying to find answers I want to hear or read rather than put in the hard long hours of quality work but it looks like there’s no running away from the truth. Common to what I’ve come across is quality content, consistency and low hanging fruits keywords which have proven to yield results when I started to put it to test. In fact, I agree with you that no good results come on a silver platter. 
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.

To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.

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