As the name implies, 1MC is a program that allows you to rack up a sizable number of clicks to your website in a very short time. It advertises itself as a “fake traffic generator” and that’s really what it is; it’s not going to earn you any money through commissions or referrals. It may earn you cash through pay per view ads, particularly if you use a proxy list, but its primary purpose is typically for testing. If you want to make sure your analytics are accurately reporting clicks, you can schedule a number of clicks through the software and track them. You can also set it to freely spam a site with clicks, to test the server under load. You should, of course, avoid targeting competitors; they won’t take kindly to an unwanted server stress test.
Believe it or not, you can increase your website presence by consistently blogging and adding outstanding content to the internet. What is most beneficial for your website is that by writing exceptional content, you’re increasing your brand awareness. You’re adding value that is specific to your target audience. If you’re doing this correctly, your “audience” is searching for the very search terms (also known as keywords or key phrases) you’re writing about, and thus, it increases your chances of your website being found in the search results pages (known as SERPs).
This isn’t necessarily anything really technical, but rather subjective. In my humble content marketing opinion, perfection is overrated. Now, does that mean you get to skip out on the research and publish crap? No, no. Instead, it means that there is a point of diminishing returns and sometimes, it’s better to ship it, assess performance, and revise.

Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
Secure (https) to non-secure sites (http): Since Google began emphasizing the importance of having a secure site, more websites are securely hosted, as indicated by the “https” in their URLs. Per the security protocol, however, any traffic going from a secure site to a non-secure site will not pass referral information. For this issue, you can correct by updating your site to be secure through a third-party SSL certificate.
This particular site isn’t really an automatic traffic generator. Instead, it’s an old, long-running network for email lists. The idea is to build an email list independent of SEO or Google, which frees you from the rigors of content marketing. You still need to work to generate leads, and you still need a website to pull in opt-ins, but FFA gives you a wide range of tools you can use to succeed. For example, a heat map and Google Analytics integration ensures the system gives you all the information you need to succeed. You can split-test as many as 100 variants on a given page, to make sure you’re using the best one. And, of course, the network is old and long-running, meaning it has a positive reputation and a history of being effective. You can find plenty of support from the staff and other users.
To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.
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